Niger Innis, Republican primary candidate for Nevada’s 4th Congressional District, visited Alamo last week.

Niger Innis, Republican primary candidate for Nevada’s 4th Congressional District, visited Alamo last week.

Niger Innis of Las Vegas, a Republican candidate for the state’s 4th Congressional District, was in Lincoln County April 27. He held a public forum at the Sinclair Station in Alamo, meeting with a few supporters and undecided voters. Innis claims he is the only one of the four Republican candidates in the primary who can defeat incumbent Democrat Steven Horsford in the general election, in a district that is dominated by urban North Las Vegas. In an interview with the Record, Innis said he was finishing up a weekend tour of the district, fifth largest (by square miles) in the nation, and had made stops in Pahrump, Yerington, Fallon, Ely, and others, as well as Alamo. Innis said he entered the race for the Congressional seat, because, as he said, “of the overwhelming warm response that I got from rank and file Republicans, conservatives, even some Democrats, who are disenchanted with the Democratic Party and its failure to deliver. The biggest disappointment I hear spoken of, from both sides, is they view Horsford, as just part of the (Harry Reid) machine.” He said many even view Sen. Reid as not being a great servant of the people of Nevada, but rather now, “a creature of Washington, and not a creature of the people he is supposed to represent.” He said most of the concerns he has heard of deal “mostly about land use, and the situation at Bunkerville, (with Cliven Bundy and the BLM). It sparked a great deal of interest, as victims, even in other parts of the state, of an over obtrusive government” Innis said, if elected, one of the first pieces of legislation he would seek to pass, would be what he calls the Nevada Parity Act. He explained the Act to be where BLM would have to give back up to 60 or 50 percent of the federal land it now controls, back to the individual states, Nevada being just one of several western states where BLM controls a majority of the land, 87 percent in Nevada, nearly twice as much as other western states. He said most of his conversation with the small group he met with in Alamo focused on “getting more control over our land. It’s just not in Bunkerville, it’s all over the state, and not just with the BLM, but with a variety of regulatory agencies.” Innis feels, if elected, he will be careful not to be the guy who promised one thing to voters at home, but once in Washington, “forgets our name, and forgets there is a rural [community].” He said he feels there is much in the way of a potential boomtown in the state with oil, mineral deposits, and people who “have a decent, creative idea, and need some land to privately invest money to explore that idea. We have to liberate the land so folks can invest and build businesses, and build prosperity that the federal government can tax.” Innis is one of four candidates on the Republican primary ballot, with the winner taking on Steven Horsford in the November general election. If he is the primary winner, Innis said he would actively seek to have open debates with Horsford.